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Intellectual Free Post Posted on 05-07-2004

RevolutionarySistah
Los Angeles, CA
....aiight, so I see people starting free posts all the time, I figure I can do it too. Only twist is, if you gon' post something......let it be intellectual (i.e nothing about a party, grad nite, or shout-outs) something tells me this post is gon' die quickly....... :roll: oh well, i gave it a shot!
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HU_Intellect replied on 06-10-2004 01:40PM [Reply]
I honestly believe that the major key to changing the state that black people are in at this time is, RE-DISCOVERING the importance of EDUCATION. It is truly the key to our liberation. Today we really don't have as much enthusiasm towards education as we should have. No white man controls us or holds us down we are the MASTERS of OUR OWN DESTINIES!!!!!!
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replied on 06-10-2004 05:07PM [Reply]
I am in tune with what is being said by most in this thread. It is an extremely hard problem to find a solution for. de Bohème said: >> Get rid of all forms of projected-racism found in commercial hip hop Not only projected-racism, but the materialism that hip hop is blasting into the community. That needs to go. People can't pay bills but they have 22's. Is that really necessary to get attention? What about the person inside. >> Black developed/supported education systems that stem beyond HBCUs; we need black elementary schools and high schools. Are you talking about private black elementary schools, or public? If private the communities that need them wont have the funds to send their students (or maybe a free private school? is it possible? yes). >> decrease/elimante the epidemic of teenage parenting. Definitely. I live in West End, Atlanta (AUC!) in the heart of where the civil rights struggle took place. I can see the progress since then and let me assure you.... there is none. I would go so far as to say we've digressed in these areas. The thing is there is no desire in these communities to live a different life. Children don't excel because their parents didn't. Youngsters hug the block because the older cats do it. This is the cycle they find themselves in. However, the cycle could end simply if the individuals decided to do something greater with their lives. Nothing is stronger than the will! It takes a concious decision. But these individuals see nothing but the materialism portrayed in the media and the rims spinning outside which they want to imitate. Not knowing all along true fulfillment comes from inside. The powers that be know what is going on in the majority black city of Atlanta, yet they let it continue because they need it. Capitalism requires at least %5 of the population to live in poverty. I see mechanisms in place/action which I have interacted with. The prison systems, ****, especially crack and ****. There is no way that black people after slavery had the means to supply so much dope to the community. It was supplied by yours and my government. However, it is still the choice of the individual to go that route. I think one thing need to do is present alternate choices that may have been overlooked for those that are caught in this trap. I say one thing because there is so much more that needs to be done.
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RevolutionarySistah from Los Angeles, CA replied on 06-10-2004 05:24PM [Reply]

REALity wrote:
I can see the progress since then and let me assure you.... there is none. I would go so far as to say we've digressed in these areas.
well Real, I don't live in Atlanta but I can still tell that we failed Martin when it came to his dream. Unfortunately, most black people don't want to accept the fact that as a people, we are worse off now than we were back then. this may sound a little radical, but i think intergration had A LOT to do with it.......But anyways, Look at all the resources we have that we fail to use?? Can you believe that a **** would actually risk his life just to read?? How many young black children would love to read a book?? Getting them to see the importance of reading is dang near impossible! And what about voting?? Another thing we died for, and most of us don't even go out and vote. I definitely agree with Calvin and education being the key. I have been saying that for a long time now. If we educate ourselves, we will and can take over everything. Right now, we are the number consumers in this country. Basically, the whole economy runs on the backs of our people. Unfortunately, most black people don't know that, and they fail to realize how important it is. If you control the US Economy.....YOU CONTROL THE U.S!! I think economics shoud be taught at a you
de boheme wrote:
>> Black developed/supported education systems that stem beyond HBCUs; we need black elementary schools and high schools.
ever heard of King Drew?? Or St. Bernard's??? I know as a Floss Angeles native, you have. The increasing hispanic population is taking these so-called black High School's over. and it can't just be "black", meaning a school wit a bunch of ni99as running around. No. It has to put an emphasis on how we as young people can lead our people out of this whole are previous generation (yes, I am putting some blame on the older folks.....who do you think taught us??) dug us into. Which means teaching us about the African diaspora, and our history before the **** ships. How we once acheived great things and have the ability to relive history,so to speak. well, I have said my peace.....
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replied on 06-11-2004 12:15AM [Reply]
I completely agree with HU_Intellect. Education may seem stiff, impersonal, and austere, but these are only preconceived notions put forth by society. I am not only talking about education in schools.. it starts with the family. If African-American families promoted education (in particular history... so important I'm not going to go into it), it would produce healthier, more positive children (in most cases).
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BxApplehead replied on 06-14-2004 01:57AM [Reply]
This is kind of random, but here are a series of phrases inspired by the **** Prez CD I was just listening to... RBG-RED BLACK and GREEN Revolutionary But Gangsta Read Bout Garvey I'm a REAL BLACK GIRL PS-"The powerful people never apologize to the powerless people for the actions they commit in order to stay in power." -The Revolution will not be commercialized. Check the real reason why you wear Angela Davis and Bob Marley t-shirts. Do you know who Che Guevera is? Do you know the real meaning of Red Black and Green, or is Angela Davis just a cute shirt of a lady with an Afro?
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Punk'd replied on 06-15-2004 02:33AM [Reply]
I think the problem with education and black folks is two-fold. Number 1: There are not enough black teachers. Everybody is either aspiring to be the next Kobe, the next Jonny Cochran, or the next P. Diddy that they are overlooking jobs that are really needed.... which brings me to reason number 2: I've said this before, and I'll end up saying it too many more times, but for the most part, Black people do not put as much emphasis on education as needed.
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replied on 06-15-2004 06:55PM [Reply]
true indeed. Then again when everyone is in front of the television all the time, they are not going to put emphasis on education
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mochabonnie replied on 06-18-2004 05:10AM [Reply]
Funny you should make the comment on the teacher thing...the whole thing is one big ol' cycle. The new 'gangsta rap' culture glorifies money and 'high-rollin', and as a result, black kids think that the only way to be the next big man or to be successful is to go out there and make a whole lot of money. So they get pulled into a job because there is the potential of making money. Either they are trying to get scoped out by some scout to play basketball or football, or get into the music industry for the sole purpose of fame and fortune. However, I think it's interesting that you metioned Johnny Cochrane, too, because the stereotype isn't just fueled by people who don't attend college. A lot of blacks focus on trying to become surgeons, businessmen, and lawyers...not that that's a bad thing, because it definitely isn't, but they often do so because they focus on the paycheck (ignoring the fact that med and law school students often have huge student loans to pay back when they're out). And the funny thing is that grabbing for the money is often masked when you're in college...it's somehow not seen as bad as doing it in music or sports/entertainment is, because hey, you have a college degree. I admit I was drawn into it myself...I wanted to be like a lawyer or a doctor, something big time so I could live in a huge house or something. But it's really about the love of it...I think I'd be bored as a lawyer and stressed as a doctor...my true calling is teaching or social work, which pays considerably less but is more enjoyable to me. As for the couples things...black couples being taboo...it's true that the number of black-black couples is diminishing, as more blacks are turning outside the race. And I'm not saying that's a bad thing. Love is where love falls -- and if my homegirl falls in love with a white or Asian man (as she is prone to) I'm happy for her. (Personally, I have a dark chocolate man, and I *LOVE* him.) What IS the bad thing is: 1) When you search for a particular race/ethnicity because you think they look better (the hair is straighter, the skin is lighter) or because you go based on stereotyped views (they have more money, they're smarter, etc.) or because you say you want your 'babies to be pretty' 2) When you have so many hang-ups about cultures -- for example, I was reading a book and the girl in there was actually ANGRY because one of her cool peeps married a white man, and yet she was always complaining how black men like to play head games and can't hang with successful black women and stuff. Basically, erase the stereotypes and start with a clean slate -- don't generalize.
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replied on 06-18-2004 10:51AM [Reply]
cinnamocha wrote:
Funny you should make the comment on the teacher thing...the whole thing is one big ol' cycle. The new 'gangsta rap' culture glorifies money and 'high-rollin', and as a result, black kids think that the only way to be the next big man or to be successful is to go out there and make a whole lot of money. So they get pulled into a job because there is the potential of making money. Either they are trying to get scoped out by some scout to play basketball or football, or get into the music industry for the sole purpose of fame and fortune.
When you are in a capitalistic society, where all of the power depends on how much you got in your pockets, you're most likely not going to want to be a teacher making about $35,000 a year or so.
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HU_Intellect replied on 07-02-2004 02:21PM [Reply]
After having a few arguments with some ignorant people I have come up with another free post. What do you guys feel about movies like SoulPlane and White Chicks. Many people say it's just entertainment, but I say it is MUCH MUCH more than that. It is nothing more than modern day "Sambo" or "Black Face" but it is sad that now we don't have to have white folks put on black face to make us look like fools we will do it ourselves. It has been happening for a while, look back at shows like "Amos and Andy" they first had a white man in black face on the show actin a A$$ and then they found some black A$$es to act a A$$ for them. **Smh** We have come so far yet it seems like we are jogging backwards.
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