News Menu

News
View Latest Posts
View Subscriptions
Posting Instructions

Active Bloggers

HBCU CONNECT HBCU CONNECT
Central State University class of 1995
Joel Savage Joel Savage
class of 1993
Kamal Imani Kamal Imani
class of
Will Moss Will Moss
Hampton University class of 1995
Dixie Somers Dixie Somers
Other College... class of 2004
Reggie Culpepper Reggie Culpepper
Clark Atlanta University class of 1998
Anica Oaks Anica Oaks
class of 2012
Beverly Johnson Beverly Johnson
class of

Office Hours: Central State President Cynthia Jackson-Hammond discusses performance-based funding

Office Hours: Central State President Cynthia Jackson-Hammond discusses performance-based funding
Posted By: Elynor Moss on December 12, 2016

Why the mission of serving the under-served must become a larger element of consideration in public higher ed spending
AUTHOR
Jarrett Carter



In 2014, Central State University made national headlines by achieving a political goal more than 120 years in the making; it was given federal land grant university status, making the school eligible for new funding and productivity in the areas of agricultural research and community outreach.

But a year prior to this historic achievement, Ohio legislature approved the adoption of a performance-based funding model for its public colleges and universities, creating a prescription for better endowed, larger institutions to maintain or grow investment through public appropriations, while smaller institutions were left with the goal of realigning programs and strategy to meet new metrics of performance.

We talked recently with CSU President Cynthia Jackson-Hammond, who helped to orchestrate the historic 1890 designation for the university and who shared thoughts on the role of legislative lobbying and identifying areas of opportunity to contend with the new funding model that is taking root in public systems throughout the country.

EDUCATION DIVE: So if there are positive or negative aspects about this kind of funding formula, what are those and what are things to be considered?

CYNTHIA JACKSON-HAMMOND: Performance-based funding seems to be sweeping the colleges throughout the United States, and it's based on the public’s outcry over the value of a college education. Governors have said we need to be responsive to people we serve, and Ohio was one of the first states to decide on performance-based funding; and for us that’s about 48-52% of our total budget.

The three measures used for Ohio are course completion, retention, and college completion. Based on these standards, I don’t think you’ll find any institution that would say that these metrics aren’t plausible because that’s our job. But the budget part is skewed, because if we aren’t all playing at the same level with the same type of students, the assessment cannot measure or work effectively.

For many 1890 universities, we’re dealing with a population of students who haven’t come from a highly motivated or resourced support system. We spend a lot of time dealing with the psychosocial elements of going to college with first-generation students from high schools which may not be at the top levels, or students who come with great economic need. So tying these things to time towards degree completion, it becomes a bit complicated for our kinds of schools.

Do you find that your efforts to lobby legislation and officials are effective in explaining those differences?

JACKSON-HAMMOND: I think that there is awareness.



But, legislators have the economy that they have to deal with, and so the question becomes do they understand the value added in these schools in trying to ameliorate the issues associated with these student types, and how it we help to drive the economy. If we are put into the same category as high research institutions, and there’s no recognition of that value added for schools which do an extraordinary job of educating this percentage of the citizenry, then there has to be a realization that it takes a few more resources to make sure these students can be successful; and develop an understanding how that helps cities and states grow.

This is the norm for minority students who may have to “stop out” to work or take care of a family. When their day-to-day living becomes an obstacle towards completion, it’s up to us to explain that phenomenon to officials and to help them understand that, while it’s not the norm for larger institutions and the kinds of students they recruit, it is the norm for us and there is a value behind that.

Do you have any concern about the new federal administration regarding deregulation and what that could mean for performance-based metrics?

JACKSON-HAMMOND: I think there’s not a lot coming from the president-elect about the college experience, or how to promote the citizenry through higher education. Pell funding is really big for 1890’s and the students we serve which is about 73 percent of my students. What are they going to potentially take from Pell grant to give to another source like deportation efforts, we don’t know. Because we serve the underserved of all groups, there is a concern about students, American minorities, and international students - about what may impact their interests in coming to our schools. There are many uncertainties, and we are on pause waiting to see what the next steps will be. For the universities to thrive, we have to have certainties and predictability.

Are there any metrics with which you are comfortable and would like to see more weight given to funding considerations?

JACKSON-HAMMOND: The one thing that I’m always working with legislators about is affordability. Pell Grant doesn’t cover everything, so how do we make college more affordable without reducing quality? We still have to pay people and provide competitive opportunities. So we work to get our legislators to give more support to campuses offering opportunities to the most underserved populations. We take those who may have been marginalized somewhere in the educational system, and help them to become productive citizens… That process cost; so if our matrix is based on things that are more difficult for schools with this mission, then who fills in the gaps? College affordability is an issue, but states will have the responsibility to fill in the gaps to provide the best opportunities for all students.


If you enjoyed this article, Join HBCU CONNECT today for similar content and opportunities via email!
Comments
Please Login To Post Comments...
Email:
Password:

 
More From This Author
Accept your invitation to become a new hire at an Employer in your field of expertise!
#FAMUConnect: Who do you know from FAMU? We introduce you to Mr. Shaun Watson
#HBCUEmployment: Opportunities are available! Seek a new career here...
Connect with the HBCUConnect representatives for help attaining a career in Healthcare, Education, and Technology
Careers for professional talented workers: applicants invited to apply to the following new employers
Working on attaining a new career requires options. Research the jobs on this list to see if you want to apply!
Latest News
How Can The Belgium Government Explain Its Association With A Man Like Bill Gates?

How Can The Belgium Government Explain Its Association With A Man Like Bill Gates?

Photo: Right, the former Belgium Prime Minister, Charles Michel, receives Bill Gates in Brussels The crimes of Bill Gates are well tolerated by almost all the advanced countries in Europe a ...more
Joel Savage • 13 Views • October 25th, 2020
Oakwood University Alumni on the Front Lines of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Oakwood University Alumni on the Front Lines of the COVID-19 Pandemic

While the COVID-19 pandemic has upended life for nearly everyone -- healthcare workers, first responders, chaplains, and other essential workers -- has had to face more risks than most. Oakwood Univer ...more
Reggie Culpepper • 17 Views • October 22nd, 2020
Black Billionaire Robert F. Smith to  Donate $50 Million to Support STEM Students at HBCUs

Black Billionaire Robert F. Smith to Donate $50 Million to Support STEM Students at HBCUs

The Student Freedom Initiative announced today a $50 million personal gift from Robert F. Smith, philanthropist and Founder, Chairman and CEO of Vista Equity Partners. This gift matches the initial fu ...more
Will Moss • 56,738 Views • October 22nd, 2020
Oakwood University Crowns Miss UNCF 2020

Oakwood University Crowns Miss UNCF 2020

On the beautiful Sunday afternoon of October 18, 2020, Samara Bowden was crowned as Oakwood University's Miss UNCF 2021 at a socially-distanced coronation event, in front of the Monument to Service Pl ...more
Reggie Culpepper • 584 Views • October 21st, 2020
Delaware State University Awarded Five-Year $7.5 Million Research Grant to Establish Quantum Sensing Center

Delaware State University Awarded Five-Year $7.5 Million Research Grant to Establish Quantum Sensing Center

The U.S. Department of Defense has awarded Delaware State University a five-year $7.5 million research grant to establish a DoD Center of Excellence in Advanced Quantum Sensing (CoE-AQS) on campus. ...more
Reggie Culpepper • 1,297 Views • October 21st, 2020
Popular News
Louisiana Upholds Life Sentence to Black Man For Stealing Hedge Trimmers in 1997

Louisiana Upholds Life Sentence to Black Man For Stealing Hedge Trimmers in 1997

While this may not be HBCU related news, as an AFrican American male, I had to share this appalling decision by the Louisiana court system to keep a man in jail with a life sentence for such a petty c ...more
Will Moss • 367,170 Views • August 6th, 2020
Apple to Invest over $40 Million Dollars into HBCUs - Time to major in Computer Science!!!

Apple to Invest over $40 Million Dollars into HBCUs - Time to major in Computer Science!!!

On Tuesday Johnny C. Taylor, President and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund stopped by “NewsOne Now” to make a major announcement that could literally change the lives of thousands of HBCU st ...more
Will Moss • 109,960 Views • March 11th, 2015
Kamala Harris Promises to Forgive Student Loan Debt for HBCU Graduates

Kamala Harris Promises to Forgive Student Loan Debt for HBCU Graduates

Harris promises to offer free tuition for low-income students at public and historically Black colleges Democratic VP candidate also pledges to forgive student-loan debt for HBCU graduates who earn ...more
Will Moss • 60,107 Views • September 10th, 2020
Black Billionaire Robert F. Smith to  Donate $50 Million to Support STEM Students at HBCUs

Black Billionaire Robert F. Smith to Donate $50 Million to Support STEM Students at HBCUs

The Student Freedom Initiative announced today a $50 million personal gift from Robert F. Smith, philanthropist and Founder, Chairman and CEO of Vista Equity Partners. This gift matches the initial fu ...more
Will Moss • 56,738 Views • October 22nd, 2020
Travis Scott, Son of Two HBCU Graduates, Looking to Cover Tuition for 5 HBCU Students!

Travis Scott, Son of Two HBCU Graduates, Looking to Cover Tuition for 5 HBCU Students!

Travis Scott has offered to cover a semester of tuition for five students who are attending a historically Black college or university (HBCU). The “Highest In The Room” emcee took to Twitter to twe ...more
Will Moss • 54,520 Views • October 8th, 2020
Please Give Us a Like on Facebook!