Blogs Menu

Blogs
View Latest Posts
View Subscriptions
Posting Instructions

Active Bloggers

Steven Lively Steven Lively
class of 1983
Will Moss Will Moss
Hampton University class of 1995
Elynor Moss Elynor Moss
North Carolina Central University class of 2003
HBCU CONNECT HBCU CONNECT
Central State University class of 1995
Kamal Imani Kamal Imani
class of
Albert Slocum Albert Slocum
Howard University class of 1993
Anica Oaks Anica Oaks
class of 2012
LaMarr Blackmon LaMarr Blackmon
Cal St Univ, Long Beach class of 1992

The truth about gaming disorder, from Fortnite to World of Warcraft

The truth about gaming disorder, from Fortnite to World of Warcraft
Posted By: Elynor Moss on July 07, 2019

As the number of young gamers has risen sharply, so have addiction narratives

Alex Hern
@alexhern


Gaming disorder may be a newly recognised condition, but disordered gaming is anything but new. In 2010, a Korean couple was arrested for fatal child neglect spurred by an obsession with Prius Online. Five years earlier, another Korean man collapsed and died after a 50-hour session playing StarCraft in an internet cafe.

In the west, World of Warcraft, released in 2004, was one of the first games to trigger addiction narratives in the mainstream press, with the game blamed for causing college students to drop out of university and others losing careers and families.
What’s changed this time round is partially a matter of scale. World of Warcraft peaked in 2010, six years after launch, with 12 million subscribers worldwide.

Fortnite, released less than a year ago, has more than 10 times that at 125 million. Even if nothing else had changed, 10 times the players probably means 10 times the stories of a disordered relationship with the game.

The game’s free-to-play nature – it charges for cosmetic upgrades but anyone can download and play without spending a penny – means that a far greater proportion of those players are young compared with previous gaming phenomena.
Not only are there more young people – who are not great at setting boundaries – but there is also more visibility of all types of play: an eight-hour gaming session that might be guiltily shrugged off by an 18-year-old student in a university town can prompt concern for that same student’s parents if they are just a year younger and living at home.

But while Fortnite may have become the poster child for this latest run of gaming addiction stories, it is a mild example of the form.



Games in Fortnite are short, typically running 20 to 30 minutes and the rewards for playing a lot are minimal, and cosmetic only. That’s substantially less demanding than more “hardcore” games, including World of Warcraft itself, which can require hours of continuous play and offers substantial in-game rewards, which can only be achieved by those who put in the requisite commitment.

Similarly, Fortnite forgoes one of the more malign innovations the gaming industry has hit upon over the past few years, the loot box. Other games don’t offer rewards in a conventional manner: instead, players earn or buy loot boxes, sticker packs, and the like, which contain a chance at receiving the item they truly want, and a much bigger chance of receiving almost nothing. The unpredictable rewards this generates can be incredibly compelling, for exactly the same reason a slot machine **** people in.

Epic Games, the maker of Fortnite, has passed over other popular money-spinners in the gaming space. There’s no energy system, demanding money for continued access; there are no timers, offering the option to skip the countdown for cash; there is no possibility of paying to win, using real funds to buy digital advantages. Instead, the company seems to have taken a simpler tack: build a fun game, monetise it smartly and hope to make more profit from 100 million happy players than a million exploited ones.

That cuts to the core of the debate around gaming disorder. If the poster child for the condition can be linked to that dubious term despite avoiding the exploitative techniques that have been adopted by its peers, what are games supposed to do to protect players from themselves? Can entertainment just be too entertaining for its own good?

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardi...


If you enjoyed this article, Join HBCU CONNECT today for similar content and opportunities via email!
Comments
Please Login To Post Comments...
Email:
Password:

 
More From This Author
OKC Thunder's Chris Paul promoting HBCUs with 'sneaker tour' during NBA restart
Howard is the HBCU becoming college basketball’s offseason champs
Explore internship and career options available to professional ready applicants!
Three HBCUs Create Racial Justice Centers To Combat White Supremacy
5 Star Recruit Kennedy Chandler Receives Multiple Offers from HBCUs
Netflix CEO is donating $120 million to HBCUs, wants it to celebrate
Latest Blogs
Emmy Awards Honor Virginia State University’s Jesse Vaughan

Emmy Awards Honor Virginia State University’s Jesse Vaughan

The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences - Capital Region Emmy Awards honors Virginia State University’s Jesse Vaughan with the Ted Yates Award. The award is given for both community service ...more
Jesse Vaughan • 9 Views • August 9th, 2020
HBCU Multi-Billion Dollar Opportunity

HBCU Multi-Billion Dollar Opportunity

Please take a look at my LinkedIn post: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/tedonusit_liberty-university-poured-millions-into-sports-activity-6698215664655581184-M9lq ...more
Steven Lively • 21 Views • August 9th, 2020

"I Wrote this song when thinking about Karen, Darin and Black Lives Matter"

"I Wrote this song when thinking about Karen, Darin and Black Lives Matter" My Special Sauce Got em Cappin This is about black children’s self-esteem being lowered due to them feeling like the rest ...more
Kamal Imani • 12 Views • August 7th, 2020

"I Wrote this song when thinking about Karen, Darin and Black Lives Matter"

"I Wrote this song when thinking about Karen, Darin and Black Lives Matter" My Special Sauce Got em Cappin This is about black children’s self-esteem being lowered due to them feeling like the rest ...more
Kamal Imani • 10 Views • August 7th, 2020

"I Wrote this song when thinking about Karen, Darin and Black Lives Matter"

"I Wrote this song when thinking about Karen, Darin and Black Lives Matter" My Special Sauce Got em Cappin This is about black children’s self-esteem being lowered due to them feeling like the rest ...more
Kamal Imani • 10 Views • August 7th, 2020
Popular Blogs
Divorce in America in 2009 – What’s love got to do, got to do with it?

Divorce in America in 2009 – What’s love got to do, got to do with it?

Join Brother Marcus and the cast and the crew of the Brother Marcus Show live this Sunday evening on February 1, 2009 @ 8:00 p.m. for another hot topic in our community! “Divorce in America in 2009 ...more
Brother Marcus! • 70,728 Views • January 27th, 2009
VISINE ALERT!!!

VISINE ALERT!!!

Seemingly innocent medication such as Visine eyedrops are used by people to concoct a mixture with similar effects as a date-rape drug. When mixed with alcohol and taken orally, the eyedrops can l ...more
Siebra Muhammad • 43,495 Views • May 23rd, 2009
THE MOST FAMOUS WORDS IN NASCAR RACING IS NOW

THE MOST FAMOUS WORDS IN NASCAR RACING IS NOW "GOTCHA" THIEF !

IT'S PRETTY OBVIOUS FOLKS: Some of our Republican senators and congressman..are Swearing & Wearing White Sheets Also ..NASCAR was given 70million dollars in tax breaks ..in the New Fiscal Cliff Deal ...more
David Right • 43,129 Views • December 28th, 2012
Black College Student Sentenced to 12 Years in Prison for Kissing a White Girl

Black College Student Sentenced to 12 Years in Prison for Kissing a White Girl

Albert N. Wilson, a former University of Kansas student, has been sentenced to 12 years in prison and a lifetime of probation after being convicted by an all-white jury of raping a white teen girl. Bu ...more
Will Moss • 32,610 Views • June 4th, 2020
Black History Daily:  Who Was the First Black Female Dentist?

Black History Daily: Who Was the First Black Female Dentist?

In 1890 Ida Gray Nelson Rollins (1867-1953) became the first black woman to earn a doctor of dental surgery degree in the United States. She graduated from the University of Michigan in June. Nelson ...more
Stacie Coulter • 21,999 Views • August 22nd, 2011
Please Give Us a Like on Facebook!